We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, He draws us to Himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Living right on the left coast of North America!

So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter.—2 Thessalonians 2:15

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

A concerned citizen writes to an anonymous friend about ambiguous teaching.

Dear Friend,

The circumstance is becoming quite troubling regarding the apparent contradiction of Jesus Christ's teaching by clergy motivated (or so they claim) by Pope Francis' teaching and example.

Though certain individuals might innocently or willfully profess error, we do not doubt that the Church is protected always from officially teaching error. We trust in the promise given to Saint Peter by our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. We know that no doctrine taught ex cathedra by the Bishop of Rome, i.e., the man seated upon the Chair of Christ's Holy Apostle Peter, will ever contradict the Gospel revealed by God.

Many are concerned that Pope Francis is not aware of nor duly concerned about how the teaching issued in his name is being misused. Because of his apparent disinterest or intransigence, many of us are at a loss how to impress upon Pope Francis the seriousness of the issue. Despite the counsel and concerns expressed by our learned and pious fathers in the episcopacy and many other erudite brothers and sisters who have tried to offer Francis their guidance, sadly the Holy Father has lashed out at the Church's faithful sons and daughters and has thus far refused to clarify the teaching of Amoris Laetitia.

Do you think it reasonable and good, dear friend, in light of mounting pressures upon the faithful, to request a restraint be placed upon those who would attempt to undermine the teaching of our Lord Jesus Christ? Surely it is appropriate to defend the ancient and continuing teaching of the Church, i.e., it is appropriate that the Eucharist should only be received by the penitent faithful. Or, to put it another way, is it not appropriate to defend the teaching that the faithless, i.e., those whose lives deliberately contradict or deny the teaching of Jesus Christ, should be denied admission to Holy Communion?

You would be right to ask, my friend, from whom should one request that our errant brethren be bound and prevented from spreading their errors? There is, of course, only One Who can grant such a restraint, though His will, not ours, be done. I am confident that you know of whom I speak, and that you will add your own prayers to the countless requests going up in the hope that we may be spared any further confusion coming from Rome.

Yours,
N.

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