Living right on the left coast of North America!

So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter.—2 Thessalonians 2:15

Thursday, December 15, 2016

St. Louis Sacred Music Workshop: March 10-12, 2017

SACRED MUSIC WORKSHOP IN ST. LOUIS
INSTITUTE OF CHRIST THE KING SOVEREIGN PRIEST

Canon Lebocq directs Seminarian Choir (2012)


St. Francis de Sales Oratory, March 10-12, 2017

Price: $95.00 per person; incl. meals, lodging not included

If you are interested in participating in this unique event, please contact the Oratory office by phone at 314-771-3100 or via email at sfds@institute-christ-king.org.

Both the practical and spiritual aspects of sacred music will be the focus of an upcoming Sacred Music Workshop in March. Already in the planning stages, the intensive two-day program will include spiritual talks given by Institute canons, Gregorian chant instruction including Gregorian Rhythm and an introduction to Chironomy imparted by Canon Wulfran Lebocq, currently serving in Ireland and was the Chant Master at the Seminary for a number of years.

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We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, He draws us to Himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.