We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, he draws us to himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Quoting Kwasniewski: Reverence Is Not Enough: On the Importance of Tradition.

Eat this up.
The liturgy is not simply a series of tasks, a holy agenda; it is a school of life, of thought, of desire, in which we are enrolled from our baptism until our death. How the liturgy understands human nature, how it asks us to behave, the axioms and aspirations it places on our lips and in our hearts, will shape us into an image of itself. Our participation in the earthly liturgy of the Church will prepare us well or poorly for our participation in the heavenly liturgy, depending on how well we have been educated in the school of Christian tradition. This is why it is such a grave problem if the curriculum and faculty of this school have been compromised by worldliness, corrupted by ideologies, diluted by a loss of confidence in the truth of the Gospel, or simply distracted by the whims and fads of their surrounding anti-Christian or semi-Christian society.
—from Reverence Is Not Enough: On the Importance of Tradition by (Dr.) Peter A. Kwasniewski.
http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2016/10/reverence-is-not-enough-on-importance.html#more
Brilliant!

On the one hand, we routinely witness in parish (Ordinary Form/Novus Ordo) Masses priestly narcissism, limp theology typical of cafeteria (c)atholicism and trite music to which aged hippies remain attached and therefore blind to the sublime riches of the Church's vast treasury of sacred music.

On the other, we have ad orientem worship which enables and sustains a proper focus on God, and sacred chant and polyphony which invites all into a dance between receptive silence to the word of God and the adoration and praise of God.

Tired of cotton-candy liturgies where priests and music ministers attempt to reinvent the Mass by hanging cheap bobbles on the Tree of Life? Do you long for authenticity which places you in the Presence of the living God? Perhaps it's time to visit the Extraordinary Form (Usus Antiquior) and/or the Ordinariate Divine Worship.

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