We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, he draws us to himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Thursday, June 2, 2016

Stroik on Church Architecture


ChurchPop has published a series of statements by Duncan Stroik, architect par excellence, entitled 10 Myths About Contemporary Sacred Architecture That Need to Die.
Myth #6) The fan shape, in which everyone can see the assembly and be close to the altar, is the most appropriate form for expressing the full, active, and conscious participation of the body of Christ.
This myth comes out of the questionable view that the assembly is the primary symbol of the church. The fan shape is a wonderful shape for theater, for lectures, even for representative government—it is not an appropriate shape for the Liturgy. Ironically, the goal often stated for the fan shape is to get more participation from the faithful, yet the semicircular shape is derived from a room for entertainment.
The fan does not derive from the writings of Vatican II; it derives from the Greek or Roman theater. Up until recently, it was never used as a model for Catholic churches. In fact, the first theater churches were nineteenth century Protestant auditoriums designed to focus on the preacher.

Duncan G. Stroik is the 2016 recipient of the Arthur Ross Award. He is
Professor of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture and founding editor of the Sacred Architecture Journal. His work continues the tradition of classical and Palladian architecture, also known as New Classical Architecture.—Wikipedia

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