We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, he draws us to himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Oklahoma - 1; Canada - 0.

"Oklahoma... Plen'y of heart and plen'y of hope."
Oklahoma Governor Signs Bill to Teach People “Abortion Kills a Living Human Being”
http://www.lifenews.com/2016/06/07/oklahoma-governor-signs-bill-to-teach-people-abortion-kills-a-living-human-being/
The governor of Oklahoma has signed a pro-life bill into (law) that will teach the public, and students, that “abortion kills a living human being.” The notion is easily provable given the inordinate amount of scientific evidence, ultrasound imaging and comments from top scientists about the humanity of unborn children.
Meanwhile, Canada descends ever deeper into the culture of death.

 

The CBC wrangled an internationally known Canadian to weigh in on the euthanasia debate. Jean Vanier may have demonstrated what the Catechism of the Catholic Church identifies as an "error of judgment into which one can fall in good faith".
Matters are really not helped when said prominent Catholic's comments aren't the best representation of the Church's teaching, which are:
Euthanasia
CCC 2276 Those whose lives are diminished or weakened deserve special respect. Sick or handicapped persons should be helped to lead lives as normal as possible.

CCC 2277 Whatever its motives and means, direct euthanasia consists in putting an end to the lives of handicapped, sick, or dying persons. It is morally unacceptable.

Thus an act or omission which, of itself or by intention, causes death in order to eliminate suffering constitutes a murder gravely contrary to the dignity of the human person and to the respect due to the living God, his Creator. The error of judgment into which one can fall in good faith does not change the nature of this murderous act, which must always be forbidden and excluded.

CCC 2278 Discontinuing medical procedures that are burdensome, dangerous, extraordinary, or disproportionate to the expected outcome can be legitimate; it is the refusal of "over-zealous" treatment. Here one does not will to cause death; one's inability to impede it is merely accepted. The decisions should be made by the patient if he is competent and able or, if not, by those legally entitled to act for the patient, whose reasonable will and legitimate interests must always be respected. (Perhaps this is the paragraph which Jean Vanier had in mind...?)

CCC 2279 Even if death is thought imminent, the ordinary care owed to a sick person cannot be legitimately interrupted. The use of painkillers to alleviate the sufferings of the dying, even at the risk of shortening their days, can be morally in conformity with human dignity if death is not willed as either an end or a means, but only foreseen and tolerated as inevitable Palliative care is a special form of disinterested charity. As such it should be encouraged.
Every Catholic Canadian should memorize those four sections (2276 - 2279) of the Catechism and, in the event of serious illness, insist (in writing if necessary) on being treated according to the official teaching of the Catholic Church.

In conclusion, a man who is to more than a few folk a living saint has made comments which, unfortunately and disappointingly, fumble the Magisterial teaching of an actual (canonized and miracle working) saint:
…laws which legitimize the direct killing of innocent human beings through abortion or euthanasia are in complete opposition to the inviolable right to life proper to every individual; they thus deny the equality of everyone before the law. It might be objected that such is not the case in euthanasia, when it is requested with full awareness by the person involved. But any State which made such a request legitimate and authorized it to be carried out would be legalizing a case of suicide-murder, contrary to the fundamental principles of absolute respect for life and of the protection of every innocent life. In this way the State contributes to lessening respect for life and opens the door to ways of acting which are destructive of trust in relations between people…
Abortion and euthanasia are thus crimes which no human law can claim to legitimize. There is no obligation in conscience to obey such laws; instead there is a grave and clear obligation to oppose them by conscientious objection.—Pope Saint John Paul II, Evangelium Vitae, par.72-7; quoted at Catholic Insight.

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"A multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world(.)—Wisdom 6:24. Readers are welcome to make rational and responsible comments. Any comment that 1) offends human dignity and/or 2) which constitutes an irrational attack on the Catholic Faith will not go unchallenged. If deemed completely stupid, such a comment will most assuredly not see the light of day. Them's the rules. Don't like 'em? Move on.