We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, he draws us to himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Saturday, June 11, 2016

Canadian adult stem cell treatment helps Multiple Sclerosis patients.

Adult stem cell therapy offers hope to MS sufferers.
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/jun/09/stem-cell-therapy-gives-hope-to-ms-patients
A radical and risky (adult) stem cell therapy has been shown to halt and even reverse some of the symptoms of those worst affected by multiple sclerosis, a disease that in many people has proved untreatable.
Doctors in Canada conducted an experimental (adult) stem cell transplant with 24 patients who were expected to be confined to a wheelchair within 10 years. After receiving the treatment most of the patients regained control of their lives, becoming able to walk, play sport and drive.
To succeed, the transplant required the destruction and rebooting of each person’s immune system – such a high risk approach that one of the patients died. But the others, followed up for between four and 13 years, had no further progression of the disease.
A few research details from the primary source, the Lancet:

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(16)30169-6/abstract
Immunoablation and autologous haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation for aggressive multiple sclerosis: a multicentre single-group phase 2 trial
Findings
Between diagnosis and aHSCT, 24 patients had 167 clinical relapses over 140 patient-years with 188 Gd-enhancing lesions on 48 pre-aHSCT MRI scans. Median follow-up was 6·7 years (range 3·9–12·7). The primary outcome, multiple sclerosis activity-free survival at 3 years after transplantation was 69·6% (95% CI 46·6–84·2). With up to 13 years of follow-up after aHSCT, no relapses occurred and no Gd enhancing lesions or new T2 lesions were seen on 314 MRI sequential scans. The rate of brain atrophy decreased to that expected for healthy controls. One of 24 patients died of transplantation-related complications. 35% of patients had a sustained improvement in their Expanded Disability Status Scale score.
Interpretation
We describe the first treatment to fully halt all detectable CNS inflammatory activity in patients with multiple sclerosis for a prolonged period in the absence of any ongoing disease-modifying drugs. Furthermore, many of the patients had substantial recovery of neurological function despite their disease's aggressive nature.
Note, this treatment has nothing to do with the immoral embryonic stem cell technologies which involve the destruction of human embryos in order to procure (embryonic) stem cells.

While adult stem cell research is contributing to many effective therapies, embryonic stem cell research has yet to produce any successful therapies. Millions of dollars are heaped on controversial embryonic stem cell research projects while adult stem cell researchers are, in many cases, forced to beg for support.
https://www.stemforlife.org/
http://www.stemcellresearchfacts.org/

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