We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, he draws us to himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Friday, April 15, 2016

Adversity for those who believe in the Resurrection of Jesus Christ.

The Faux-diversity of Snake-cularism

Any faithful Christian is able discern that the West is fast falling into times during which nations are forced to witness the secular idol of diversity constricting, snake like, around its prey. Its prey—i.e., anything or anyone that does not conform to its narrow definition of an otherwise useful term—is subject to restrictive actions which include marginalization of Christian thought and practice on university campuses (intellectual and psychological adversity), social and political adversity (alienation from common conversation and punitive legal actions against persons and businesses), and religious adversity (loss of ecumenical common ground).

The common culture is at risk of comple fragmentation because those who hold to a restrictive ideology or tribe of ideologies that may best be defined as regressive—and which is typically the mindset and praxis of the self declared progressive—manage to persuade others that, among other fantasies, feelings trump facts. In the worldview of the regressive secularist, feelings are facts. In the worldview which holds that feelings trump facts, whosoever asserts their feelings first tends to own the narrative. Those who own the narrative, typically the radical regressive who loathes anything or anyone Christian, tend to attempt to bully others into submitting to their way (or the highway) because the regressive agenda has no substance and therefore cannot pass muster in the arena of rational ideas. Thus, those who hold to some form of secular tribalism resort to an abuse of court and government to limit the free expression of thoughts which threaten to expose the regressive agenda for what it is. And what is itIt—in its various manifestations—is fascism.

Will the real fascist please stand up?

The Resurrection teaches us, at least those of us who believe Jesus really did rise from the dead, that we who are Catholic must be prepared to, if you'll pardon the timing of the pun, rise above the narrow confines of the terms and strictures dictated by those who think of themselves as anything but fascistic and authoritarian but who routinely use the courts and quasi-legal commissions or tribunals in an attempt to rob people of their inalienable rights. In the West, the regressive ideologue has sullied the word 'liberal' and poisoned man's ability to think independently and maintain intellectual integrity.

The most obvious gesture of respect we can offer regressive thinkers is a firm requirement that they own up to reality and, barring such ownership, demand that they leave the welfare of the world and its citizens to the adults on the planet who understand that personal responsibility, common sense and the protection of inalienable rights—beginning with the right to life—are non-negotiables for any and every society that has any hope for survival. As long as we tolerate relativism and regressive ideologies, we risk a surrender of civilization to the mad hatters within our borders and those huddling at the rusty gates of western societies.

The Resurrection confirms Jesus uniqueness.

To the sola diversity mind, preoccupied as it is with a diversity that, ironically, tends to render everything or every behaviour the same in terms of acceptability, though not necessarily equally morally good, the assertion that Jesus is the sole mediator between God and man constitutes an egregious threat to much of late-20th and 21st Century religious, political and social theory.

Governments led by regressive liberals, and certain extra-governmental or non-governmental socio-political movements, cannot bear opposition to their attempts at social engineering. Because they are so proud of their political and social superiority, they simply cannot entertain even the remotest possibility that someone or some group is not willing to embrace their misguided attempts to manufacture Eden-on-earth. The secular apocalypse, i.e., the attempt to bring about change (conformity to regressive secularist doctrine) by scaring the hell out of people through some quasi-religious story—call it global warming or climate change or overpopulation or the Zika virus or what-have-you—is a modus operandi borrowed from certain religious sects or cults that, like all false prophets, have repeatedly failed to identify the date of the "apocalypse".

Is it not ironic, and more than slightly amusing, that secularists of the liberal regressive mindset would choose to engage in a mode of mind-shaping that they have in the past mercilessly ridiculed as the practice of brainless zealots bent on controlling others through fear and intimidation? How different are the pundits of climate change from the false prophets of yesteryear? The answer is—not much different at all. Advocates of the secular apocalypse might protest the comparison of their agenda to the failed predictions of the prophets of doom by pleading—'But climate change is real!'

We digress.

Why do so many people invest so much effort in promoting conspiracy theories which attempt to denigrate a belief—belief in the Resurrection, i.e., the belief—of Christians which has allowed Christians to face death and every manner of persecution at the hands of their persecutors with serenity? The answer is that the devil hates what Christ managed to achieve right under his diabolical nose, the redemption of mankind. The devil hates the Resurrection of Jesus and all that the Resurrection means for mankind. The devil is quick to enlist allies who hate what the devil himself hates. Minions aplenty inhabit the grimy corridors of government and the mainstream media, and they are angry at faithful Christians. They are are eager to demean Christians and eager to rob people of their inalienable rights. The same minions are not angry at Episcopalians, the United Church of Canada and other compromised groups that have chosen worldly values over the Gospel.

Christians who believe in the resurrection of Jesus from the dead—and we cannot call ourselves true Christians unless we believe in the Resurrection—have an opportunity to share the Good News merely by believing in the Resurrection and living a faithful Christian life—lay, ordained and/or religious—informed and formed by the Resurrection. Belief in the Resurrection is a gift from God, and that gift invites us to enter more deeply into the Gospel narrative handed on by the Apostles who witnessed the Resurrection.

Yes, our witness to the Resurrection will likely provoke the ire of those who disagree with us. Our faith, hope and joy will, however, conquer the despair and doubt of those who have yet to ask God for the grace to believe.

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"A multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world(.)—Wisdom 6:24. Readers are welcome to make rational and responsible comments. Any comment that 1) offends human dignity and/or 2) which constitutes an irrational attack on the Catholic Faith will not go unchallenged. If deemed completely stupid, such a comment will most assuredly not see the light of day. Them's the rules. Don't like 'em? Move on.