We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, he draws us to himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Sanctify yourself and you will sanctify society.—St. Francis of Assisi.

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Knights of Crux

The Crux tagline reads "Covering all things Catholic". Indeed, they covered things alright. Typically, Crux covered over Catholicism with a not-so thin veneer of regressive liberal religion no different from the pablum that the National (c)atholic Reporter, i.e., the Irrational Cataract Distorter, foists on its shrinking readership comprised of CINOs who, possessed by a saccharine ideology slightly more annoying than faux-traditionalist hooey, lapped up Crux's presentation of truncated versions or visions of the Catholic Faith.
“We vowed to make Crux a place where all voices could be heard, and we stuck to that pledge,” (Crux editor Teresa) Hanafin said on Crux, March 11.
The problem is that not all voices represent the Catholic Faith. The last time this blogger checked in with the Catechism, i.e., some moments ago, the bishops in communion with Rome are still our authorized teachers, not wayward theologians nor malcontents who are more agnostics than adorers of Christ. We simply do not need to hear those voices of dissent(ery), especially those who, like Walter Cardinal Kasper, seem all too happy to nail Christ to the cross of secular values.

Given 40+ years of alter-magisterial pontifications by regressive liberals who don't have the guts to admit they stopped being Catholic long ago but appear to revel in spreading their liturgical and theological cottoncandy among the innocent faithful, why on earth should Catholics tolerate a "news" agency that offers a platform to the last remaining hippies and heretics who want nothing less than to refashion the Church in their own image? Catholics have allowed pushy laity and poorly formed clergy to dominate the Vatican II narrative for far too long.
Crux was launched in September 2014. It aspired to cover “all things Catholic” with content to appeal to active Catholics, “casual” Catholics who may not be regular Mass attendees, and general readers interested in Pope Francis, religion and spirituality.
Given Crux's practice of entertaining more cutthroats than actual Catholics, a reasonable person would be justified by calling into question its editor's definition of "active Catholic". And, there is no such thing as a "casual Catholic". Are Crux's editors saying one can be a part time Catholic? Yeah—Jesus has nothing important to say about casual Catholics.
Revelation 3:15-16 DR
I know your works: you are neither cold nor hot. Would that you were cold or hot! So, because you are lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spew you out of my mouth.
One is either a(n entirely) faithful Catholic, believing all that the Church teaches and, with God's help, striving to live the Faith whole and inviolate, or one is a lapsed Catholic who rejects Church teaching or, as a cafeteria Catholic, picks and chooses which teachings accord with one's own disordered preferences on any given day.

Instead of a consistent diet of theological cuisine, Crux offered a mix of pablum and the occasional (rare) bit of fine dining. Health and safety warning: What fool would want to eat at a greasy spoon like Crux knowing his next meal might be contaminated with error or some uninvited guests like Sam 'n' Ella?

A forum which offers compromised versions of the Faith merely serves to distract seekers and is, therefore, an obstacle to potential converts and reverts which prevents them from discovering what Christ actually said and did and what the Church actually teaches. Instead of joyful orthodoxy, Crux dished out mostly bland heterodoxy. That is why it failed.

There are plenty of faithful Catholic sites which offer truth, goodness and beauty to nurture the sin-sick soul back to health: the New Liturgical Movement; the National Catholic Register; EWTN; etc. Furthermore, there are plenty of blogs that "general readers" can access which faithfully and joyfully propose the Catholic Faith undefiled: Monsignor Charles Pope's blog, for one.
At the time of the news site’s launch, (Crux editor John L. Allen Jr) told CNA that the Catholic Church’s global presence and rich traditions justify focused news coverage. “(T)he Catholic Church matters and needs to be taken seriously by mainstream news outlets,” he said.
The Catholic Church does matter, and she must be taken seriously for the sake of souls. The fiction which Crux and other rags promote does not matter in the least. Crux was a place where
demons and monsters shall meet, and the hairy ones shall cry out one to another, there hath the lamia lain down, and found rest for herself.—Isaiah 34:14.

Crux could not represent the Church's true face because it was blinded by its devotion to a regressive liberal agenda which habitually attempts to elevate the fiction of relativism to the level of reality.

Oy vey iz mir!

Crux, it has been announced, is partnering with the Knights of Columbus.
Catholic Pulse, a news and commentary website operated by the Knights of Columbus, will merge with Crux, adding its resources to Crux’s blend of staff-generated reporting and analysis with pieces by respected guest contributors. The Crux website will feature the tagline: “Keeping its finger on the Catholic Pulse.”—Crux

The Knights of Columbus and Crux are pleased to announce that they plan to enter into a partnership in which Crux will remain an independent news outlet headed by John Allen and Inés San Martín.
The project is designed to make one of the world's best known Catholic news platforms even stronger. The partnership will combine the Knights' resources and spirit of service with the journalistic experience and commitment of Crux.
As part of the project, Catholic Pulse, a news and commentary website operated by the Knights of Columbus, will merge with Crux, adding its resources to Crux's blend of staff-generated reporting and analysis with pieces by respected guest contributors. The Crux website will feature the tagline: "Keeping its finger on the Catholic Pulse."
Reporting and analysis by John Allen and Inés San Martín will continue to focus primarily on the Vatican, the Church and Catholic issues generally, and international religious freedom. The aim is to ensure that informed, responsible, and fair journalism helps to set the tone for discussion of Catholic affairs in the United States and around the world. Over time, plans call for additional contributors to be identified to add their commentary to the lineup.
The Knights will respect the editorial freedom of Crux, trusting it to present news and commentary in a way that serves the good of the Church.
Let's hope that the Knights' trust is not misplaced. Let's hope, too, that the good men of the KofC will exercise strong oversight of their new partner.

Forums which allow heretics and regressive liberals to foment dissent only serve to hinder those who are most in need of God's mercy. Crux was and may still be a fraud which hinders sinners from encountering the Truth and from being engaged and healed.

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"A multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world(.)—Wisdom 6:24. Readers are welcome to make rational and responsible comments. Any comment that 1) offends human dignity and/or 2) which constitutes an irrational attack on the Catholic Faith will not go unchallenged. If deemed completely stupid, such a comment will most assuredly not see the light of day. Them's the rules. Don't like 'em? Move on.