We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, he draws us to himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Sanctify yourself and you will sanctify society.—St. Francis of Assisi.

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Easter Vigil with the Ordinariate. Easter Sunday photos.

To those of us Romans who long for the routine of a solemnly celebrated Ordinary Form Mass, especially those of us who have tasted the excellence of the Extraordinary Form of the Mass but very much love the Ordinary Form or at least the thought of some day praying Mass ad orientem in Latin (and Greek, of course, with English readings), the Ordinariate liturgies offer a beautiful substitute for, or is that complement to, the Ordinary Form as it is currently celebrated.

Last night, this blogger joined with other Romans present among the Ordinariate faithful to attend the Vigil according to Divine Worship, The Missal, i.e., the missal of the Anglican Ordinariate. Those 'other Romans' included folk who are regular Extraordinary Form Catholics and Catholics repelled by goofy celebrations of the Ordinary Form. It was a lovely surprise to witness several other OF Romans in attendance at the Ordinariate Triduum liturgies.

Imagine the Church of the Holy Sepulchre when different rites (churches) are simultaneously celebrating Mass or the Divine Liturgy. Upstairs, a Mass in Portuguese; downstairs, a Mass in hieratic English with Latin anthems. The two liturgies leapfrogged each other at times. The bells of the Gloria rang out twice during the evening. That hardly seems inappropriate given the solemnity being celebrated, and the fact that the upstairs Mass could occasionally be heard downstairs didn't seem to bother anyone.

In a word, the Ordinariate Vigil was beautiful. It's form and content is easily recognizable to any Catholic of the Latin West. The Exultet was well handled by the celebrant, Fr. Carl Reid, who was assisted throughout the Vigil by three other Ordinariate priests, including Monsignor Peter Wilkinson. Father Birch preached a theologically rich homily to an attentive congregation.

The schola cantorum, though small and tested by the vicious malady which has attacked everyone here it seems, managed a solemn evening of chant, polyphony and hymnody. The virus took its toll on the group comprised of four singers, but their heart more than made up for any loss of vocal power.

The English chant was very much a delight, and the fact that the congregation navigated the Proper chants well suggests that Ordinary Form parishes, by giving preference to saccharine contemporary songs containing non-liturgical texts, are underestimating people's ability to chant. As mentioned, the congregation included a few roaming Catholics from Ordinary Form parishes who managed the chant well enough. Everyone chanted the very accessible formulas. Let it be known that Roman Catholics can and do sing confidently when given the opportunity to sing/chant music worth singing.

The Vigil was held in the basement chapel (... a comfy cubbyhole) of Our Lady of Fatima Church, a Portuguese parish on Vancouver Island. The parish very generously shares its home with the Ordinariate. However, during these high holy days the Portuguese community rightly required use of the upper church for their celebration of the Holy Saturday Vigil. There was/is something immensely appealing and satisfying about meeting in a church basement with a small community that exhibits a reverence sorely lacking in non-Ordinariate parishes.

The Anglican patrimony that preserves the Apostolic Faith, versus the confused Anglicanism of the ACoC, TEC and much of the CofE, is safe in the hands of the Ordinariate folk who are Catholic in the fullest sense of the word.

Select photos from Easter Sunday Ordinariate Mass


(click on images to enlarge)


The Lesson (Old Testament Reading)






Confirmation

Schola hard at work.

Monsignor Peter Wilkinson

This is my body... .


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