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So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter.—2 Thessalonians 2:15

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Risen, the movie, approaches.

You may have heard that a motion picture titled Risen is being heralded as the unofficial sequel to the magnificent The Passion of The Christ by Mel Gibson. We'll see about that.

Tom Felton, aka Draco Malfoy of Harry Potter fame, finds himself among a stellar cast that includes Joseph Fiennes of the famous Fiennes clan (actor Ralph, filmmakers Sophie and Martha, composer Magnus and others) and the versatile Cliff Curtis, among other capable actors.

The movie references images such as the Shroud of Turin and appears, at first glance, to be a respectful imagining of the events surrounding the Resurrection of the Lord.

Wikipedia stuff:
Risen... is an upcoming American drama film directed by Kevin Reynolds and written by Reynolds, Paul Aiello and Karen Janszen. [...] Columbia Pictures will release the film on February 19, 2016.
In 2013, Reynolds was brought aboard as director for the planned project The Resurrection of Jesus Christ (also known more simply as Risen), a film intended as a mystery/thriller and "unofficial sequel" to The Passion of the Christ set to depict the events surrounding the 40 days following Christ's resurrection in a script written by Paul Aiello as told from the viewpoint of a Roman centurion ordered by Pontius Pilate to investigate growing rumors of a risen Jewish messiah and to locate the missing body of Jesus of Nazareth in order to quell an imminent uprising in Jerusalem.
TRAILER: click on the following link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OcTVLfn5i8g#t=60
USA Today interview: Fiennes
Joseph Fiennes appears fully Roman in Risen.
"Risen is an incredible noir detective tale. That's the angle that appealed to me," says Fiennes.
Fiennes, 44, star of 1998's best picture-winning Shakespeare in Love, is the fictional Clavius, who is assigned by Pontius Pilate (Peter Firth) to unravel the mystery of what happened to Jesus in the weeks after the crucifixion.
With his aide Lucius (Tom Felton), Clavius is tasked to dispel rumors of a risen Messiah and prevent a Jerusalem uprising.
When Jesus' body disappears from a sealed tomb, Clavius interrogates followers of "The Nazarene" to find out what really happened.
"That's where the detective work comes in," says Fiennes. "This is an extraordinary story and well-known to everyone. But it takes us on this journey through the eyes of a nonbeliever."
Clavius' doubts of a supernatural occurrence are challenged, forcing him to part ways with his warring life.
Producer Mickey Liddell worked for more than 10 years to bring the story to the big screen before Kevin Reynolds (Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves) took over the directing job and rewrote the screenplay with Paul Aiello. Much of Risen focuses on the enigma, along with battle scenes between Romans and their zealot foes.
Fiennes steeped himself in gladiator-style combat for the military scenes, which Liddell calls "epic" in scope. The elusive Jesus (Cliff Curtis) is only seen in glimpses.
Ultimately, he says, the story is compelling enough to attract an audience for a Bible story that goes beyond faith-based moviegoers.
"This is pure cinema," says Fiennes. "I am foremost a lover of stories. The Bible is the most extraordinarily rich source of narratives, featuring the most beautiful stories ever written or handed down."
Reminder: Easter Sunday is March 27th.

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We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, He draws us to Himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.