We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, He draws us to Himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Bishop Lopes: A Pledged Troth. A pastoral letter on Amoris Laetitia.

Monday, January 25, 2016

Forging Communion

Forging, as in a forgery.
ROME, January 21, 2016 (LifeSiteNews) – A group of Finnish Lutherans were offered Holy Communion by priests at a mass held in St. Peter's Basilica following a meeting with Pope Francis on January 15, according to a report by the Finnish periodical Kotimaa 24.
Lutheran bishop Samuel Salmi was visiting the Vatican as the head of a delegation that included a youth choir that was to perform there. Salmi says he met privately with Pope Francis.
After the personal audience with the pope, the delegation was present at a celebration of the Catholic mass. According to Salmi, at the time of communion the non-Catholics placed their right hands on their left shoulders, a traditional way of indicating that they were ineligible to receive the Eucharist. However, the celebrating priests insisted on giving them communion.
Salmi told Kotimaa 24 that “I myself accepted it [Holy Communion].” He added that “this was not a coincidence,” and nor was it a coincidence when last year the pope seemed to accept the notion of a Lutheran woman receiving communion with her Catholic husband.
Where Peter goes, so often goes the Church. Pope Francis' imprudent comments and actions are of a kind that will have many unintended consequences that will (or should) cause scandal to the faithful. Is it fair to non-Catholics to impose Holy Communion upon them? That is, is it not unfair to compel people to accept what Catholics believe to be the actual Body and Blood of Jesus Christ by forcing them to accept Holy Communion, thereby forcing a non-believer to unworthily receive the Body of Christ? Or do those priests who insisted on giving sectarians the Holy Eucharist think that by their actions the Lutherans will suddenly accept the doctrine of the Real Presence while they remain opposed to the grace which grants acceptance of that very reality? How do such actions avoid creating culpability for putting souls at risk?

Other partnering communities, for example the Anglican Church of Canada (ACoC) and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, have attempted to forge communion among themselves with the results being a reduction to "mere christianity" which happens to bear a remarkable resemblance to secular religion.

Let's not pretend that the nicey-nice "communion" gatherings between Catholics and heretical sects will overcome the near insurmountable obstacles which exist and which constitute real impediments to actual communion. Then again, we live in an age when feelings trump facts and the doctrine of the Church to many is as malleable as a contemporary understanding of the concept of mercy, which is to say that a definition of mercy is emerging which ignores sin and its consequences and which covers over any culpability for it with universalist claptrap.

UPDATE
Marko Tervaportti, Director of the Finnish Catholic Information Centre, issued a clarification regarding who may legitimately receive Holy Communion: January 20, 2016
https://s3.amazonaws.com/lifesite/Translation_of_Finnish_Catholic_Information_Service_statement.pdf

No comments:

Post a Comment

"A multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world(.)—Wisdom 6:24. Readers are welcome to make rational and responsible comments. Any comment that 1) offends human dignity and/or 2) which constitutes an irrational attack on the Catholic Faith will not go unchallenged. If deemed completely stupid, such a comment will most assuredly not see the light of day. Them's the rules. Don't like 'em? Move on.