So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter (2 Thess. 2:15). Guard what has been entrusted to you. Avoid the godless chatter and contradictions of what is falsely called knowledge, for by professing it some have missed the mark as regards faith (1 Tim. 6:21-22).

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Elephant Talk. Facepalm.

... and then there are days when Catholics must ask—'What did the Holy Father just say?'

The paragraph that is raising eyebrows:
Pope Francis: It’s a problem each must answer, but a pastor-friend once told me: “We believe that the Lord is present there, he is present. You all believe that the Lord is present. And so what’s the difference?” — “Eh, there are explanations, interpretations.” Life is bigger than explanations and interpretations. Always refer back to your baptism. “One faith, one baptism, one Lord.” This is what Paul tells us, and then take the consequences from there. I wouldn’t ever dare to allow this, because it’s not my competence. One baptism, one Lord, one faith. Talk to the Lord and then go forward. I don’t dare to say anything more.

"I wouldn’t ever dare to allow this, because it’s not my competence. (... ) I don’t dare to say anything more."

Is it that too much and, perhaps, too little was said? Too much speculation and too little theological precision? Do the Holy Father's words give Lutherans the opportunity to reevaluate their separation from Rome? Do the Holy Father's words give permission for (some) Lutherans to receive Holy Communion in the Catholic Church? Extraordinary circumstances permitting Holy Communion provided by Canon law aside, what is going to happen now that the Holy Father's comments have entered the ether of the internet?

A real concern is that some, perhaps too many people, will interpret the Holy Father's comments as license to do whatever they want without considering the absolute necessity of a properly formed conscience. That is, a conscience configured to the teaching of the Catholic Church.

Raised Eyebrows

Fr. Dwight Longenecker
Inter Communion with Lutherans? A Convert Comments

1 comment:

  1. Is it that too much and, perhaps, too little was said? Too much speculation and too little theological precision? Do the Holy Father's words give Lutherans the opportunity to reevaluate their separation from Rome? Do the Holy Father's words give permission for (some) Lutherans to receive Holy Communion in the Catholic Church? Extraordinary circumstances permitting Holy Communion provided by Canon law aside, what is going to happen now that the Holy Father's comments have entered the ether of the internet?

    Yes.
    Yes.
    No.
    Yes.
    People will correctly infer that the Holy Father has opened the door to unconditional intercommunion (albeit in his characteristic ad hoc, non-magisterial way), and will act accordingly.

    There's really no room left for doubt about which direction he'll take with his upcoming post-synodal exhortation, or that the majority of bishops and priests will follow suit, either from agreement or a misplaced belief that the pope is always right.

    ReplyDelete

"A multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world(.)—Wisdom 6:24. Readers are welcome to make rational and responsible comments. Any comment that 1) offends human dignity and/or 2) which constitutes an irrational attack on the Catholic Faith will not go unchallenged. If deemed completely stupid, such a comment will most assuredly not see the light of day. Them's the rules. Don't like 'em? Move on.

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