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So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter.—2 Thessalonians 2:15

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Denzinger, Durocher and the USCCB/Lutheran Declaration

The following is an unpaid public service announcement offered, with respect, to Archbishop Durocher, of Canada, who made a rather crass comment during the Synod.
Back to school for you!
The latest exchange between Catholics and Lutherans includes the following resource listed on the Abbreviations page of the USCCB/Lutheran Declaration:
[DH] Henrich Denzinger Compendium of Creeds, Definitions, and Declarations on Matters of Faith and Morals, revised, enlarged, and in collaboration with Helmut Hoping, edited by Peter Hünermann for the original bilingual edition and edited by Robert Fastiggi and Anne Englund Nash for the English Edition, 43rd Edition (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 2012).
http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/ecumenical-and-interreligious/ecumenical/lutheran/upload/Declaration_on_the_Way-for-Website.pdf
Unlike Archbishop Durocher who has treated Denzinger's text lightly, i.e., almost with contempt, the US Bishops who recently issued the ecumenical declaration think the Denzinger compendium of Catholic doctrine is important enough to include it in their contribution to the Catholic/Lutheran document.

Perhaps Archbishop Durocher might reconsider his comments made at the Synod:
(T)he archbishop of Gatineau, Quebec, Paul-André Durocher, who was asked, "What about this question of the discipline versus the doctrine of administering Holy Communion to divorced and civilly remarried Catholics? Is it safe to say that this issue is still under debate? And if so, what does that say about the question of the dogma and the discipline?"And he gave an answer that stunned a number of us inside the press room. He (Durocher) said, "If you want dogma, go read Denzinger. The Synod will be deciding and talking about whether this is a discipline or it's a dogma." That caused one priest who was sitting very, very close to us to sort of go into a rage. He actually confronted the archbishop on the way out of the door and said, "All you bishops, everything you're doing here, is this conciliarism, which is destroying the Church! You are confusing the faithful. You don't know the Faith."—h/t Vox Cantoris/Voris
Catholic World Report characterized Archbishop Durocher's comments as follows:
(A)t the conclusion of the "Briefing" in the Sala Stampa‎ (...) a reporter from The Tablet (a left-leaning Catholic periodical published in England) asked if divorce and remarriage were still a firm doctrine for the Synod Fathers or just a matter of mutable discipline [video HERE time index 1:16:35]. In response to this pointed question, Archbishop Paul-André Durocher, President of the Canadian Episcopal Conference, ‎astonished many in the room by proffering a very snide and imprudent remark that those interested in doctrine should consult Denzinger-Schönmetzer (a well-known and highly respected compendium of Catholic doctrine/dogma) while the Synod Fathers would continue to treat divorce and remarriage as an issue open to discussion, and—therefore—possibly open to change.
Archbishop Durocher's comment = B as in baloney, S as in sophistry.

The Lord Jesus taught (St. Matthew 5:32; 19:9) and the Catholic Church teaches (CCC1650, 1664, 1665) that divorce and remarriage (if the first union was valid) is adultery. Archbishop Durocher's beef is, then, not with Denzinger but with the Lord Jesus Christ to whom all bishops will someday be required to give an exact account of their words and actions.

Read, too, the comments section of Fr. Z's blog regarding Archbishop Durocher's comments.
http://wdtprs.com/blog/2015/10/6-oct-synod-notes/

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