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So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter.—2 Thessalonians 2:15

Friday, October 9, 2015

"Kasper's proposal is preposterous." A transcript of an informative exchange on EWTN.

Illuminating commentary about the Synod.
World Over - 2015-10-08 – Synod Roundup–Week 1, Fr Gerald Murray, Robert Royal with Raymond Arroyo.



3’40”
Raymond Arroyo:
Archbishop Chaput... challenged the content of the working document itself.
[ Reading from a speech at the Synod delivered by Archbishop Charles Chaput ]
“Paragraphs 7-10 of the Instrumentum did a good job of describing the condition of today’s families. But overall, the text engenders a subtle hopelessness. This leads to a spirit of compromise with certain sinful patterns of life and the reduction of Christian truths about marriage and sexuality to a set of beautiful ideals — which then leads to surrendering the redemptive mission of the Church.”
What does he (Archbishop Chaput) mean by this and how widespread is this idea among the bishops in that room.
Fr. Gerald Murray, JCD:
There is always a danger, Raymond, that the Church, when addressing a certain topic, will engage in sociology rather than theology. In other words, describe how people are living and then try and say how this fits in with the Christian life. Really, a synod has to be an extension of the theological reflection that the Church takes to the Gospel and to her defined doctrines. And what that means is the life situation of the people is judged by the Gospel, not the other way around. And that’s really where the concern, I think, for Archbishop Chaput and others—there were three theologians, two Italians and a Frenchmen who wrote a critique of the working document—(who pointed out)... the inadequate theological explanation of some of the mysteries surrounding Christian doctrine on marriage and life(. T)his adversely affects the Synod because it does drive it down into this level of ‘what’s going on now and how do we accommodate ourselves to it’. That’s not what Christianity’s about. Christianity’s saying the word of God must train us and guide us and inspire us to change how we live.
11:23
Arroyo:
Is this game (the Synod) fixed? Is the rig already in the machinery?
Fr. Murray:
Well, put it this way,... the way this Synod is set up it favours having a discussion about a topic that really is closed. Communion for the divorced and remarried is not an open question. Cardinal Kasper thinks it is; some his allies came to the floor to say it is. It is not. Cardinal Erdo said that in his opening address. I’m very pleased about that because... part of the problem here we’re dealing with, Raymond, (is) process is overcoming product. The fact that people hear (that) the Catholic Church is discussing whether it has to change its practice about communion for the divorced and remarried leads some people to say ‘I guess the Church doesn’t really mean what it used to say’. That’s a problem and, really, let’s hope and pray that at the end of this discussion the Synod fathers will be absolutely clear to the Holy Father that Cardinal Kasper’s proposal is preposterous, it is an offense against the nature of marriage and it should not be further discussed.

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