We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, He draws us to Himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Bishop Lopes: A Pledged Troth. A pastoral letter on Amoris Laetitia.

Saturday, June 13, 2015

Island Cataract News. Wishful thinking and dissing the Bishop.

Wishing thinking and dissing the bishop—there's a bit of tongue twister.

A dwindling and angry portion of the local flock, arguably those who might prefer to be called members of the (Dis)association of Roman Cataract Wymyn Preests sponsored Saint Iris community,
which, btw, meets at a local funeral home. How appropriate, eh? A dead zone for the theologically dead,
have stood at the frayed edge of credal Christianity for most of their adult lives, or so it would seem. You can hardly blame them for their wayward beliefs. They were raised in a climate of dissent when the ill winds of pseudo-intellectualism blew in through anyone's open window. However, one can hold them to account for continuing to promote the bile of dissent that imperils souls.

Here are some tidbits from the ever irrelevant band of aged hippies desperately clinging to their mouldy apple pie-in-the-sky dissent fest commonly known as the Island Catholic Cataract News (ICN), a nearly forgotten rag consigned to the bottoms of rabbit cages or a shadowed corner of the internet by the official Diocesan Messenger established by the good bishop Raymond Roussin, CM, God rest his soul.
[Update June 18th: A relative of the author was observed leaving copies of the ICN in the Cathedral on June 14th. Has ICN received permission to distribute its bile content in the Diocese? Not likely. That a few pastors still permit the heterodox ICN to be distributed in Island parishes is shameful!]
If you think you can stomach the full read, go HERE for the original March 2015 article. Be warned, to visit the site is to risk the possibility of having a certain disease attach itself to your eyeballs after reading the unintentionally laughable and somewhat maliciously worded content.

If the reader wishes to avoid spiking ICN stats, be assured that the excerpt that followings below the Context section is a precise citation copied directly from the article at the ICN site.

Context

Bethlehem Retreat Centre in Nanaimo, BC, formerly run by beige-clad Benedictine nuns, is up for sale. A loose alliance of parties including Roamin' Cath-o-likes, Untied Church of Canadians and Anglicants is attempting to raise funds to purchase said retreat centre.

The author of the article in question, true to the 'progressive' form, cannot resist mischaracterizing intentions and demonizing his opponents, among them Bishop Gary Gordon, Fr. John Lasczyck (Rector of the Cathedral) and (cue scary music) the Opus Dei crew. Like all self declared progressives, the author cannot help attempting to curry favour with his constituency of likeminded rabid dissenters but by promoting straw man arguments and by promoting the strategy of repeating fiction enough times until it becomes fact. Fact, that is, in the distorted opinion of the enthusiast of low-information and low critical thinking.

Fisked by yours truly, CS.
THE STATE OF THE QUESTION FOR CATHOLICS (Spoken with the authority of a self proclaimed pontiff.)

Bishop Remi De Roo and many progressive Catholics are closely associated with these developments, attending biweekly meetings at Bethlehem where the grassroots Friends of Bethlehem Society holds planning meetings focused on membership, fund raising, coalition building and grassroots involvement. It’s very exciting. (Oo, can you feel the Spirit of Vatican II!?)

As mentioned, some seventy thousand dollars has been donated overall for the program aspect of the centre. The ownership question has been given an extension to secure one or two more partners, hopefully including the United Church of Canada along with the Anglican Diocese who have been leading the charge. (Haven't both entities closed a number of properties over the past decade due to a lack of funds largely due to dwindling congregations?)

The stumbling block for Catholics is the ownership question. (No. More accurately, the stumbling block, if you will, is ensuring that any Catholic institution is and remains truly Catholic. Entering into a partnership must necessarily preserve the identity and integrity of the Church. Duh!)

THE CURRENT DILEMMA

Many people are wondering where the Catholic Church stands on the question of investing as a partner in Bethlehem (Partnering with... groups that do not share the doctrine of Jesus Christ and His Church?). The history of the centre included ownership by the Diocese in 1986 under Bishop Remi De Roo. The Benedictine Sisters purchased it, with the help of the community, from the Diocese in 2001. Two years ago, Bishop Richard Gagnon was elevated to the archdiocese of Winnipeg just at the time the Diocese of Victoria was looking again at purchasing it back. As a result, the effort fell fallow.

The new Catholic Bishop Gary Gordon was approached by the new Anglican Bishop Logan McMenamie to be a purchase partner as a sign of solidarity between the two Christian denomination(s) (Do local Anglicans have any purchasing power? See note above). Anglicans and Catholics in Victoria have been particularly close (Close, as in the star Alpha Centauri is close to the Sun when compared to the distances between galaxies?) since The Second Vatican Council in the mid-1960s (ah, those halcyon days of pleasant spirituality).

There have been no signs of positive response, just the opposite unfortunately. It was felt that the Sisters of Saint Ann might be in a position to make the profitable investment that purchase of Bethlehem can mean. Discussions were underway when it was suddenly announced that the idea was closed. It is well known that the Sisters of St. Ann would never proceed with such a step without getting permission from the local Ordinary. (Really? The evidence for such a claim? Did the Sisters of Saint Anne, bereft of vocations, consult with the Diocese prior to donating their former Queenswood property and buildings to the University of Victoria? Nope. It would have been a nice gesture to the Diocese if the Sisters had considered donating or even selling the property to the Diocese. But, they did not. Contrary to the idle speculation of the author, the Sister are not held to the local bishop's authority in financial matters. The bishop can say, however, who operates in his diocese. That's his canonical right.)
OPUS DEI?
On the topic of retreat centres, the new Catholic bishop is known to have been expressing an interest in such a project. (True!) He said he was heading that way in his last diocese, Whitehorse and has been presenting the idea to certain groups he has been meeting with since his arrival on Vancouver Island.

He is interested in a new retreat centre but Bethlehem is not in the equation as a consideration. (And you would know... how?) Speculation (ah... there it is again.. the crystal ball of the 'progressive' minded arbiter) is that he has an independent source of funds that will not tolerate the multifaith progressive spirituality (multifaith progressive spirituality... at a Catholic retreat centre?How narrow minded of us! Someone should point out to the author that if 'progressive' means being "multifaith", then no Catholic should be progressive. Frankly, no catholic should be "progressive", at least as the so-called progressives define the word. We're Catholics, not pagans.) typified by Bethlehem, and previously Queenswood House in Victoria. Under this analysis, the new centre would have to reflect uber-Catholic values a la Opus Dei (Uber-Catholic, as in faithfulAnd this would be a bad thing?). It would be very sad if the new bishop has gotten himself compromised in this way (Unlike the writer whose Catholicism-lite is so very uncompromisingly uncompromised.).

The Diocese of Victoria is in a particular dilemma. The new pope is progressive but Bishop Gordon was appointed by the previous pope so does not reflect Francis’ style or progressive values (Without constraining Bishop Gordon to narrow political labels, it seems fair to say that Bishop Gary, and Pope Francis for that matter, defies the categories ideologues choose to place him in). He has been notably ushered in by handlers of the Opus Dei sort, including Archbishop Michael Miller (Basilian!) of Vancouver and the rector of the cathedral here on Vancouver Island, (Fr.) John Lasczyck.

(Here comes the Spirit of Vatican II pitch) The big question for the diocese and its future as a bona fide Vatican II church (such as Francis has been re-establishing) is whether he can shake off these regressive influences or whether he too will go down the indifferent path of his two immediate predecessors, bishops who made little if any real headway with their programs for the church on Vancouver Island. (Um,... how about a new Diocesan newspaper, a stronger pro-life witness (the annual March for Life), a successful ongoing capital campaign, a renewed university and college chaplaincy, CCO missionaries, increased vocations to the priesthood, several parish projects—a new church building in Sooke, new parochial school buildings, major parish renovations—a new association of faithful Catholic business leaders, not to mention rescuing the Diocese from the pastoral malfeasance of former Bishop Remi De Roo and a cadre of "progressives" who nearly bankrupt the Diocese! Apparently, the author of the article enjoys his or her own fantasy so much (s)he is willing to resort to historical revisionism and misrepresentation of the facts. Perhaps this is what the author means by progressive, i.e., progressively wrongheaded.)

Bishop Gordon would be well advised (by who? for what reason? to invest in an enterprise with dying ecclesial communities and goofball navel-gazing Gaia-worshipping spiritualists?) to seek out the progressive (as in polarizing, pejorative, puerile) Catholic voices who have been developing (deforming? damaging? defrauding? distracting?) the Catholic church on Vancouver Island for fifty years. He would also be encouraged to get on board with the Bethlehem project as a prophetic unitary symbolic gesture. (The acronym for that phrase seems apt—'prophetic unitary symbolic'—pus. Apparently progressives think of their agendas as the only ones worthy of the appellation 'prophetic'. These are the same people who missed or dissed the prophetic document of the Vatican II pope, Blessed Pope Paul VI. That is, Humanæ Vitæ.) It would show that he is looking ahead with Francis, not through the rear view mirror at the cosy church of yesteryear, and not controlled by the deadwood of Opus Dei types. (1. When has the Church ever been cozy except perhaps in the last 40+ years during which time liberal religionists have attempted to co-opt the Second Vatican Council and define any time before the Council as the dark ages? 2. "Deadwood"—Why is it that so-called progressives constantly project their own disordered self loathing on to others?)
O Canada, we still have a lot of prayer and work to do to bring people to Christ and His Church.

No comments:

Post a Comment

"A multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world(.)—Wisdom 6:24. Readers are welcome to make rational and responsible comments. Any comment that 1) offends human dignity and/or 2) which constitutes an irrational attack on the Catholic Faith will not go unchallenged. If deemed completely stupid, such a comment will most assuredly not see the light of day. Them's the rules. Don't like 'em? Move on.