We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, He draws us to Himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Bishop Lopes: A Pledged Troth. A pastoral letter on Amoris Laetitia.

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Quebec government violated Loyola High School's Charter-protected freedom of religion.

From Cardus:
The Cardus Daily 
Total Victory?
Naomi Biesheuvel | March 20, 2015
http://www.cardus.ca/blog/2015/03/total-victory

Canada’s Supreme Court ruled on Thursday in favour of Montreal’s Loyola High School, finding the Quebec government violated the Jesuit institution’s Charter-protected freedom of religion.
“It’s a total victory for the school, for parents and for the [education] ministry because it upholds the full society’s value,” said John Zucchi, an appellant in the case and father of a former Loyola student. “It took seven years but I can say I never lost faith, never lost hope.”
The ruling is good news, agrees Janet Epp Buckingham of Trinity Western University, particularly for her school’s legal fight to open a Christian law school. “The Supreme Court of Canada has affirmed the communal aspect of religious practice and that Canada is pluralist and religion is to be affirmed,” Epp Buckingham says.
She adds it’s worth noting the decision was 7-0 for Loyola, and that a minority of justices disagreed with the majority only because they wanted to go further than their colleagues were prepared to.
“The court divided 4-3 on certain aspects of the ruling, particularly on the remedy,” she adds. “But all the judges ruled that the Minister of Education, Recreation and Sport (of Quebec) violated religious freedom by denying Loyola an exemption from teaching the mandatory Ethics and Religious Culture (ERC) course.
Full article at Cardus Daily: CLICK HERE.

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