We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, He draws us to Himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.”―Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

Living right on the left coast of North America!

So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter.—2 Thessalonians 2:15

Sunday, February 22, 2015

Jesus and Church: misunderstood, maligned and mocked.

Our Lord and Saviour endured humiliations of one kind or another: slander; physical assault leading up to His crucifixion; calumny against Him and His disciples; betrayal by one of His own. One could go on.

When confronted with challenges from people who behave badly and react with their baser instincts in charge rather than reason and charity, we should recall the temptations Christ faced during the course of His public ministry and pray for the grace to endure in charity.

The Church, like Her beloved Spouse, faces every manner of accusation and confrontation: marginalization in the public square; persecution; martyrdom. These challenges purify the Church and grow faithfulness in her children.

Attacks by the state, special interest groups and even attacks by those who claim to live under the roof of the Church are to be expected. How do we in the Church respond to those who enact persecution? With love, that's how.

Love's embrace, extended to one's adversary or accuser, is a gift for their eternal salvation. Whether or not s/he immediately accepts the gift, one must extend love and forgiveness in the hope that one's offer might lead, in God's time, to salvation for that person.

Happy Lent!

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"A multitude of wise men is the salvation of the world(.)—Wisdom 6:24. Readers are welcome to make rational and responsible comments. Any comment that 1) offends human dignity and/or 2) which constitutes an irrational attack on the Catholic Faith will not go unchallenged. If deemed completely stupid, such a comment will most assuredly not see the light of day. Them's the rules. Don't like 'em? Move on.