So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter (2 Thess. 2:15). Guard what has been entrusted to you. Avoid the godless chatter and contradictions of what is falsely called knowledge, for by professing it some have missed the mark as regards faith (1 Tim. 6:21-22).

Sunday, June 8, 2014

Ireland: babies and unwed mothers. The full story, not just the spin by the mainstream media.

You may have heard about recent goings on in Ireland. For a very important clarification, visit Frank Weather's blog, Why I am Catholic. Click on the link below.


Much can be learned and a proper perspective can be gained by following the many links provided by Mr. Weathers.

Mr. Weathers points us in the direction of Catherine Corless, a local Irish historian who has documented extensively the issue at hand.

There should be no surprise that Catherine Corless' work has been misappropriated by media-types that have about as much desire to truthfully and fully present the facts as the spin doctors in the Obama Administration, and about as much depth as a desert creek during a ten year drought.
Corless, who lives outside Tuam, has been working for several years on records associated with the former St Mary’s mother-and-baby home in the town. Her research has revealed that 796 children, most of them infants, died between 1925 and 1961, the 36 years that the home, run by Bon Secours, existed.

Between 2011 and 2013 Corless paid €4 each time to get the children’s publicly available death certificates. She says the total cost was €3,184. “If I didn’t do it, nobody else would have done it. I had them all by last September.”

The children’s names, ages, places of birth and causes of death were recorded. The average number of deaths over the 36-year period was just over 22 a year. The information recorded on these State- issued certificates has been seen by The Irish Times; the children are marked as having died variously of tuberculosis, convulsions, measles, whooping cough, influenza, bronchitis and meningitis, among other illnesses.

The deaths of these 796 children are not in doubt. Their numbers are a stark reflection of a period in Ireland when infant mortality in general was very much higher than today, particularly in institutions, where infection spread rapidly. At times during those 36 years the Tuam home housed more than 200 children and 100 mothers, plus those who worked there, according to records Corless has found.

What has upset, confused and dismayed her in recent days is the speculative nature of much of the reporting around the story, particularly about what happened to the children after they died. “I never used that word ‘dumped’,” she says again, with distress. “I just wanted those children to be remembered and for their names to go up on a plaque. That was why I did this project, and now it has taken [on] a life of its own.” (Not just taken on a life of its own, but a tool used to make cheap attacks on the many people who sought to help babies and their mothers.)
Don't let ignorance gain the upper hand. Click on the link below:

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