Tempus Per Annum | Year B | Gospel of St. Mark | Cycle I

Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

We are not just material beings, but spiritual persons with a need for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment that transcends the visible confines of this world. This longing for transcendence is a longing for truth, goodness, and beauty. Truth, goodness, and beauty are called the transcendentals of being, because they are aspects of being. Everything in existence has these transcendentals to some extent. God, of course, as the source of all truth, goodness, and beauty, has these transcendentals to an infinite degree. Oftentimes, he draws us to himself primarily through one of these transcendentals. St. Augustine, who was drawn to beauty in all its creaturely forms, found the ultimate beauty he was seeking in God, his creator, the beauty “ever ancient, ever new.” —Sister Gabriella Yi, O.P.

A.I.M. ANALYSIS. INKLINGS. METACOMMENTARY.

Insulis quae procul sunt. Welcome! The digital sacristy has many cabinets. e-Media can be found at the bottom of the blog.

Lent is fast approaching. In advance of spring, a cleaning of the blog has begun. Changes are being made to reduce visual clutter and page length.

Holy Obedience

“We become Catholics not actually knowing a great deal about the Faith and keep finding ourselves suddenly realizing, ‘Oh, that’s it. That’s why the Church teaches this.’ Acceptance comes first, then practice, then understanding.”—David Mills.

Saturday, May 18, 2013

Egyptian Coptic Christian teacher accused of blasphemy

AsiaNews.it photo

From AsiaNews.it comes this excerpt of a story of the harassment of a young Egyptian social studies teacher.
In recent weeks, the case of Dimyana Ubeid Abdel al-Nour (also spelled  Demiana Abdel Nour) become front-page news. The 23-year-old Christian teacher at a primary school in Luxor was arrested on 8 May for allegedly insulting the Prophet Muhammad in class.

Faced with a large number of calls for her release, Prosecutor General Abdhallah freed her on bail (US$ 2,900), a huge sum for the young woman's family. Yet, Dimyana is still in prison where she begun a hunger strike ahead of her trial on 21 May.

Dimyana's legal ordeal began on 8 April 2012. The young teacher taught at the Shaikh Sultan Primary School and on that day was covering polytheism, religious life at the time of the pharaohs, and how Pharaoh Akhenaten had adopted monotheism. The lesson also touched on the three monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. During the class, the subject inspector was also present but he left ten minutes before the session ended.

Two days later, the school suspended the teacher after three children accused her of defaming Islam and praising the Gospel. In the following days, three separate committees as well as the school director questioned her.

The parents of some children had claimed that the teacher had compared Muhammad and the late Patriarch Shenouda III, judging the latter better than the former. However, from the start, Dimyana denied the allegations.

After questioning, all three committees cleared her. However, under pressure from parents and other teachers, the school brought the case to the attention of the Education Ministry, which opened a file against the teacher. On 8 May, she (was) arrested.
Let us pray for Dimyana, her persecutors and Dimyana's family—that truth, freedom of speech, freedom of religion and justice may prevail.

See also:
Coptic Teacher Remains In Prison
Egypt to try Coptic teacher for insulting religion

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Ad Orientem Worship

(T)he 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal reads: “The altar should be built apart from the wall, in such a way that it is possible to walk around it easily and that Mass can be celebrated at it facing the people, which is desirable wherever possible.” The subtle wording of this paragraph indicates that the position of the priest facing the people is not compulsory. Moreover, careful scrutinization of the Latin text reveals that the added phrase “which is desirable wherever [or whenever] possible” (“quod expedit ubicumque possibile sit”), refers to the provision for a freestanding altar, and not to the desirability of celebration facing the people.—Fr. Z.

Pope Benedict XVI

Beauty, then, is not mere decoration, but rather an essential element of the liturgical action, since it is an attribute of God himself and his revelation. These considerations should make us realize the care which is needed, if the liturgical action is to reflect its innate splendour.

Let The Church Be a House of Wonder

The elimination of altars and communion rails is the obliteration of sacred art. The obliteration of sacred art is the flattening of liturgical language. The flattening of liturgical language is the abandonment of ageless chants and hymns. The abandonment of those chants and hymns is the forgetting of immemorial devotions and prayers. The forgetting of those prayers is the secularization of time. The secularization of time is the laicization of clergy and religious. Their laicization is the rage to deny the mysteriousness of the faith. The denial of that mystery implies the building of churches as neutral spaces.—Anthony Esolen.

Ministry & Life of Priests

Therefore, the priest, while placing at the service of the Eucharistic celebration all his talents to make it come alive in the participation of the faithful, must abide by the rite stipulated in the liturgical books approved by the competent authority, without adding, removing or changing anything at all297. Thus his celebrating truly becomes a celebration of and with the Church: he does not do “something of his own”, but is with the Church in dialogue with God. This also promotes adequate active participation on the part of the faithful in the sacred liturgy: “The ars celebrandi is the best way to ensure the actuosa participatio. The ars celebrandi is the fruit of faithful adherence to the liturgical norms in all their richness; indeed, for two thousand years this way of celebrating has sustained the faith life of all believers, called to take part in the celebration as the People of God, a royal priesthood, a holy nation” (cf. 1P 2:4-5.9) 298.—Directory for the Ministry and Life of Priests, New Edition (2013), p. 95.

297

Cf. Ecumenical Council Vatican II, Constitution Sacrosanctum Concilium, 22; C.I.C., can. 846, § 1; BENEDICT XVI, Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation Sacramentum Caritatis, 40.

298

BENEDICT XVI, Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation Sacramentum Caritatis, 38.